Meet St. Matrona, my patron saint

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St. Matrona of Moscow

clip_image001Commemorated on April 19

Matrona was born in 1881 into a poor family in the village of Sebino-Epifaniskaya (now Kimovski) in the Tula region of Russia. Blind from birth, she bore her infirmity with humility and patience, and God made her a vessel of grace. At the moment of her baptism, the priest saw a cloud above the child, which shed forth a sweet fragrance as a sign of divine favor. From the age of six or seven, she exhibited an extraordinary gift of insight, discerning sicknesses of soul and body in the many people who visited her, revealing to them their secret sins and their problems, and healing them through prayer and wise counsel. Around the age of fourteen, she made a pilgrimage to the great holy places in Russia along with a devout benefactress. When they arrived at Kronstadt to receive the blessing of St. John, they became lost in the crowd. St. John suddenly cried out, “Matrona, come here! She will be my heir, and will become the eighth pillar of Russia.” At that time, no one understood the meaning of this prophecy.

When she turned seventeen, Matrona became paralyzed and was unable to walk from then on. Knowing that this was God’s will, she never complained but thanked the Lord. For the rest of her life – over fifty years – she lived in a room filled with icons, sitting cross legged on her bed. With a radiant face and a quiet voice, she received all who came to seek divine consolation through her presence. She foretold the great misfortunes that were to sweep down upon the country after the Bolshevik revolution, placing her gift of insight at the service of the people of God. One day when some visitors commiserated with her about her disablement, she replied: “A day came on which God opened my eyes, and I saw the light of the sun, the stars and all that exists in the world: the rivers, the forests, the sea and the whole of creation.”

In 1925 she left her village to settle in Moscow and, after her mother’s death in 1945, she moved frequently, welcomed secretly into the houses of the faithful. This was because the Communists, fearing her influence among the people, wanted to arrest her. But, every time, she had advance knowledge, and when the police arrived they learned that she had moved an hour or two earlier. One day, when a policeman arrived to arrest her, she advised him to return home as quickly as possible, promising him that she would not escape. When the man arrived home, he discovered that his wife was on fire, and was just in time to take her to the hospital.

St. Matrona led an ascetic life on her bed of pain. She fasted constantly, slept little, her head resting on her chest, and her forehead was dented by the innumerable signs of the Cross that she made. Not only the Muscovites but also people from afar, of all ages and conditions, thronged around her to ask her advice and her prayers. In this way she truly became the support of afflicted people, especially during World War II. To those who came to ask her for news of their relatives in battle, she reassured some and counseled others to hold memorial services. She spoke to some directly, and to others in parables, having in view their spiritual edification and recommending them to keep the Church’s laws, to marry in the Church and to regularly attend Confession and take Communion. When the sick and possessed were brought to her, she placed her hands on their heads, saying several prayers or driving the demons out with authority, always insisting that she was doing nothing of herself but that God was healing by her mediation. When asked why the Church was undergoing such great persecutions, she replied that it was because of the sins of the Christians and their lack of faith. “All the peoples who have turned away from God have disappeared from off the face of the earth,” she affirmed. “Difficult times are our lot, but we Christians must choose the Cross. Christ has placed us on His sleigh, and he will take us where He will.”

Having foretold the day of her death, she gave instructions for her funeral. Before falling asleep in peace on April 19, 1952, she cried out, “Come close, all of you, and tell me of your troubles as though I were alive! I’ll see you, I’ll hear you, and I’ll come to your aid.” Miracles were multiplied at her tomb and, ever since her translation to the women’s monastery of the Protecting Veil of the Mother of God (March 13, 1998), the faithful who, in their thousands, line up to venerate Moscow’s new protectress, turn to her icon and bring her their various problems as though St. Matrona were alive in front of them.

From Volume Four of the Synaxarion, compiled by the Hieromonk Makarios of Simonos Petra, Mount Athos

1st Sunday after Pentecost

allsaintsicon
All saints icon.

Here is a bit of what was sung in church last night. Incredibly moving. I could barely get through it.

The Savior’s inspired Disciples

became instruments of the Spirit through faith.

They were scattered to the ends of the earth,

sowing the glad tidings of the true faith.

From their divine garden the army of martyrs blossomed in grace.

They became images of Christ’s saving Passion,

enduring every kind of torture, scourging, and fire.//

Now they boldly pray for our souls.

v. (3) For with the Lord there is mercy and with Him is plenteous redemption, and He will deliver Israel from all his iniquities.

The noble martyrs, burning with love of the Lord,

laughed at the fires and were consumed as burning coals.

Through Christ, they burned the withered arrogance of error.

They stilled the roaring of beasts with the voice of their prayers.

Beheaded, they decapitated the demonic hosts.//

By the shedding of their own blood they watered the Church with faith.

v. (2) Praise the Lord, all nations! Praise Him, all peoples!

The heroic martyrs wrestled with beasts and were torn by their claws.

They were dismembered, slashed with swords, and shot with arrows;

they were consumed in the flames and pierced with lances.

All this they willingly endured,

for already they saw their unfading crowns, and the glory of Christ,//

before Whom they boldly pray for our souls.

v. (1) For His mercy is abundant towards us; and the truth of the Lord endures for ever.

Come, let us praise the heroes of our faith:

Apostles, martyrs, holy priests, and noble women!

They fought for the faith in every part of the earth.

Though born of earth, they were united with the heavenly hosts.

Through their sufferings, they triumphed over evil by the grace of Christ.

As unfading lights, they illumine our hearts,//

and with boldness they pray for our souls.

C.S. Lewis: The Great Divorce

Why You Should Read C.S. Lewis' "The Great Divorce" | Catholic World ...

I’ve been attending my local Orthodox parish since September and I’m looking forward to my upcoming baptism into the Orthodox Church. I’ve ventured out a bit more into the social aspects of the church by attending the Lady’s Group. It’s a study group in a book club type format. Presently we are reading The Great Divorce written by, C.S. Lewis. For me, it is a refreshing change from the fill-in-the-blank bible studies I’ve become accustomed to, but never really liked. Some, like me, enjoy this format while others struggle with the lack of traditional structure and conformity of read and answer ‘here’ type studies.

Conviction from an Orthodox brother in Christ.Kind of sounds like something Piper or Spurgeon would say...or what Jesus clearly demonstrates in the Word...hmm...:

As I said, I am enjoying the study but it is sad to read about people unwilling to give up their passions for the Ultimate Passion… Christ. Also, because I am going to be baptized soon, as I read the book, it is helping me to remember items that need to be added to my life confession I will be doing with my priest soon. Believe it or not, little memes I run across on Pinterest, as well as reading books on the lives of the ancient fathers and their experience with confession, sin, and temptation are helping me not to be too panicked about baring my life’s dirt to a priest. This concept is unheard of in protestant churches and is very new to me. As a protestant, I would confess to God, or my husband and hope no one else ever caught wind of what I did because people, especially Christians, can be incredibly judgmental. I have also been judgmental, and it is something I work on everyday. It is something I work on with the help of; the writings of the ancient fathers, (a resource not available in protestant churches sadly), my priest, the weekly opportunities for prayer & worship in my temple, and my at home prayer life.

As I said, this is all very new to me because in protestant churches, especially evangelical and charismatic churches, sin seems to be encouraged as a way for the grace of God to move in our lives. I call it ‘The Chili Dog Gospel’. Why? Because I have heard many pastors say that since scripture tells us we can tread on poisonous things and not be harmed, we should also be able to eat ‘poisonous’ things, like chili dogs, and not be harmed. ‘Go ahead and eat that chili dog and watch God move mightily in your life!!’. Um, no thanks I’d rather not eat it, fast & pray and see what happens when I move in obedience. There is very little talk, at least that I ever heard in the churches I attended, about giving things up for our sanctification. Sanctification was not something openly spoken about or encouraged. What does all this have to do with, The Great Divorce’?  This is a book that talks about the things that people do that they are unwilling to give up in ordered to be perfect as Christ is perfect. From homosexuality, to one’s intellect, to one’s ‘rights’ (the right to be offended, angry, greedy, respected, etc.) to people not wanting to give up what they perceive as security even though it keeps them in hell. Lewis lays it all out for examination by the reader. ‘Pick one or all that apply.’, he seems to be saying. Even now, over 70 years since its writing and publication, it is relevant in the life of, Believers.

St. Seraphim of Sarov:
Is being judgmental of others your passion?

People these days like to think they are, ‘modern’ and ‘progressive’. What do these words mean? If you are not willing to give up whatever sin you are justifying with these words, they are just as much a chain holding you back from heaven as they’ve ever been. We are not the first generation to use those words, or to try and talk ourselves out of giving something up we love… our ‘pet sin’. Is the need to always be seen as being right important to you? Is it so important that you are willing to give up the blessings that come from being a peacemaker? Trust me, there are more blessings from God for those who are peacemakers than those who are willing to assassinate relationships in order to be right. Interestingly enough, I don’t know of a single person who was argued into the kingdom of God…do you?

One of my favorite quotes from Saint Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox
St. Seraphim of Serov Orthodox has a word of knowledge for you if you love to stir things up and cause strife in your life and the lives of those around you.

Our passions are creating a spirit of disunity within our churches and our communities. Not only do they separate us from God, but from one another as well.

People’s passions against icons keep them out of the Orthodox Church.  Here is one that you might enjoy. You’re welcome.

Creation of the sun:
John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. (Here we see, Jesus or the Word of God, creating the universe.) This is an Orthodox icon.
Christian Art: Thomas Blackshear and Thomas Kinkade
This is a protestant icon. Just in case your passion is iconoclasm.

This bit about icons is a bit off track but not too much as there are those who are passionately against icons and yet are ok with nativity sets, Easter eggs, crosses, etc. All of which, including our bibles, are icons. I just wanted to show those who are passionately against icons and point fingers at the Orthodox church that protestants also have icons. They just call them ‘Christian art’. This iconophobia is just an example of a passion that needs to be given to the Lord. The passion that only fill-in-the-blank bible studies are real bible studies is another passion that can be given up. We all have them. Some people refuse to try anything new unless it was their idea first and they were able to lead their friends and family to it. This passion causes them to lose out on so much!

I hope this partial review (more to come possibly) has given you food for thought about the passions you hold on to that are holding you back from a more mature, complete, and fulfilling relationship with God. Oh, how I wish this book was read in schools all across America! Would people, ‘get it’? Would it help us to be more unified and to let some things go that we needlessly hold on to that are killing us and our communities? Or would most people read it and think it is for someone else but not for them?

If you’re looking to change your community, you must first be changed. How? How do we transform our communities, our places of work, school and worship through ourselves?

May I recommend asking God to show you right now your passions that are interfering with your sanctification? Then, if you’re Orthodox, take them to your priest and confess before Sunday and enjoy a Liturgy and Eucharist free from hidden passions/sins. What a weight will be lifted from your shoulders! If we do not kill our passions, they become our idols. They interfere with our sanctification, drawing nearer to God and our quest for perfection. I’m actually looking forward to my life confession. With appropriate trepidations of course. It’s not going to be fun, but it will be freeing.

I’m working on it. Lord have mercy.

 

St. Eulogius the Inn Keeper

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A Russian iconographer’s interpretation of St. Eulogius the Hospitable of Constantinople (4th c.)

 

Today, one of the persons being commemorated is, St. Eulogius the Hospitable. An inn keeper in Constantinople in the 4th century. There are 100 bible verses about hospitality. You can read them all by clicking HERE. someday, I’ll write a bit about my experience with hospitality when my husband and I hosted a home group in our home for a year. It was a good… and not so good experience. We were hospitable as a way to tithe on our wedding gifts. How can you show hospitality to those around you today… right where you are?

St. Patrick’s Day 3/17/2017

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Although it is not officially until march 17 that St. Patrick is celebrated, let’s talk about him a bit shall we? Today, my city is hosting their annual St. Patrick’s Day parade. If I had not messed up my knee yesterday, I just might have attended the celebration. Something I never would have done before I started my journey into Orthodox Christianity.

I never used to give, St. Patrick much thought before I became an Orthodox Christian. like most ‘good’ Protestants, the celebration of saints was something, ‘those other people did’. I never wore green and I dared anyone to be foolish enough to pinch me. To my protestant eyes, St. Patrick’s Day was just another excuse for people to get drunk and behave badly. It didn’t really seem to mean much to those who celebrated it beyond green beer and kissing. I always thought of him as a Catholic/Irish saint and I was neither Catholic… nor Irish. Why celebrate him? Turns out, St. Patrick is an Orthodox Christian saint. No, really. Read about him HERE.

A couple of years ago, before I began my Orthodox journey, I watched an animated movie; The Secret of Kells. It is a movie about the illuminated manuscript of the four gospels. It sparked two things within me; 1. the desire to learn more about calligraphy & illuminated manuscripts, 2. I became intrigued by the passion of people to create such a beautiful work of art & to die/risk their lives to protect it. Such passions are not ignited within the context of evangelical/charismatic circles. It’s as if these sects of Protestantism have no history to celebrate; no examples to read about, and to be encourage by, in one’s walk of faith. At least… not openly.

In the Orthodox Church, the lives of saints are read, studied, and celebrated in an effort to emulate these pillars of Christianity. Growing up in Protestantism, it was almost like a treasure hunt to try and find people of valor to read about, that is how deep the fear of saint/icon worship runs within these communities.

St. Patrick was kidnapped and taken into slavery at the young age of 16. How terrifying to be separated from friends, and family and not to know from one day to the next if he would be killed. He finally escaped and made it back to his home. Instead of returning years later and burning down the villages where he was once held captive and/or killing the inhabitants, he evangelized Ireland bringing to its people the Light of God. Talk about loving one’s enemies.

I am so thankful that I have begun my journey into Orthodox Christianity. I had an inkling of the darkness of Protestantism while I was still a Protestant (things said from the pulpit (that there is even a pulpit) and done within the church, were not aligning with scripture). However, one has no concept of how dark darkness truly is until they step into the light.

I now know how much of church history has been lost within Protestantism simply by ignoring saints. So many questions are answered when one studies the saints. How do I pray? How can I live a more ascetic life? Look to the saints. In Protestantism, only what, Jesus did is considered worthy of study. What, Jesus did was amazing and is of course worthy of study and emulation. As the Son of God, what, Jesus did was perfect and without blemish. The saints give us an example of how we can overcome the passions of the flesh, of this world, from the perspective of ones who are themselves imperfect.

When I’m having a particularly bad day, I look at St. Ignatius and I think, ‘yes, I’m having a bad day, but at least lions are not chewing on my bones’.

stignatius
St. Ignatius being chewed on by lions. When the lions were done, his friends gathered up his bones out of the arena.

St. Patrick is perhaps the most well known of saints. He is even known by those who are not religious due to the, almost, world wide celebration of him once a year. If you want to know more about the Orthodox Church before actually stepping inside of an Orthodox Church, start reading about the saints. You can head over to the websites of the Orthodox Church in America or, the Orthodox Christian Network for daily information about which saints are being remembered. I encourage you, no matter what your religious background, to find out more about the early Christian Church and the saints who lived and died for her.

Leave your protestantism at the door

Christ Almighty, Orthodox Mini Icon - at Holy Trinity Store

In September, at the new year according to the Orthodox calendar, I started visiting my local Orthodox church. Exhausted by heretical teachings of churches whose pastors had never seen the inside of a seminary, pastors and congregants who embraced anything written as long as it contained the proper buzzwords, and fed up with, ‘movements’ I needed something more but I wasn’t sure what it was… until I found the Orthodox church.

What I found, what I did not realize I was looking for until it was in front of me, what is lacking in so many ‘modern’ churches, is dogma. I already believe in miracles. I’ve seen miracles, I’ve seen angels. Even witches believe in angels. What’s the dogma? Who does your church say Christ is? How does your church approach, Christ? How do they approach the worship of the Uncreated One? Do they even worship Him or do they entertain the flock then have a ‘rah-rah meeting’, also known as a sermon? After almost 50 years of sermons, I’m all sermoned out. I need to be at the feet of God worshiping Him, loving on Him and being loved back.

I believe that the best way for I, or anyone one else for that matter, who is interested in exploring the Orthodox church, is to do so wholeheartedly. Yes, it can be a bit daunting at first to enter an Orthodox Church and to see all the icons, candles, murals, to hear the chanting and watch the deacon cense the icons and people. it can be especially unsettling if the last church you attended before coming to an Orthodox Church was barely identifiable as a church. One, puny cross against a large, bare white wall (so that the announcements can be played while people find their seats no doubt) no more hymnals- who reads music anymore? No vestments. Nothing really to make it stand out from the other cubes/stores in the strip mall with which it shares space. Do I sound snobby? I don’t mean to, I’m just over the blending in that so many churches do so as not to offend. To be inclusive. However, we as Christians are not to be one with the world. We are to be one with God. Set apart and different with a purpose. Purposefully different. I no longer wish to worship in a space reminiscent of office space. I don’t want to pray in a white cubicle that looks worldly. I wish to pray in a space that looks ‘other worldly’. A space that looks like something God would occupy. A space that is grand and opulent. A space that prepares me for an eternity in the presence of God.

When I’m having a difficult time focusing in prayer, looking at a saint’s icon helps. The candles help. My beloved prayer rope helps. Keep your prayer closet. I need a prayer temple. Quiet… mostly. Reverent. A temple which engages all five sense in prayer, and worship of God our king.

One thing that I’ve noticed that I cannot do while in an Orthodox Church is, I cannot look at it through protestant eyes and understand the importance of the mystery set before me in the form of vespers or Div. Liturgy as being a mystery and letting it be a mystery.

It’s ok for us not to understand everything that is going on around us in a spiritual setting. Spiritual things are supposed to be mysterious. God is suppose to be mysterious. In my church travels through the years, I’ve noticed that many protestants believe that they have God all figured out. They do not seem to understand that the moment you think you have God figured out should be the moment you realize whatever it is you’ve been studying was not God or else you would not be able to understand Him. How can you understand His uncreatedness? His wonderment? His divinity? And it is HIS divinity not ours.

When walking into an Orthodox Church, one is to have the sense of leaving the world behind them, and walking east. East toward God, His divinity, and worship of this divine, uncreated Being in the most spectacular, colorful, and reverent way humanly possible. I, for one, am grateful it’s unlike anything I’ve ever experienced as a protestant. ‘In for a penny, in for a pound’ is my current motto. I am walking out my Orthodox Church experience one service at a time. One prayer at a time, and doing my best to experience it with child like wonder and not pick it apart through protestant intellect. That’s not to say that the Orthodox mind is a simple mind. Not at all! I’ve met many amazing and intelligent people at my church. What I am saying is that I’m not going to go into this experience thinking I know all the answers. I am a stranger in a strange land. Just as I would not go to France and expect everyone to be an American, nor have I come to this new-to-me church expecting everyone to change for me and sing all my favorite hymns, paint over the icons, and stop lighting candles. If I wanted a protestant experience, I would not be attending an Orthodox church. I came to this particular church to have this particular experience. To learn what they know. To look at God through the philosophical eyes of the writings of ancient fathers. To learn about tradition (a word scorned in many protestant churches), to learn about saints and martyrs. To hear new prayers. To see the bible written on a wall in the form of an icon or mural. To have this ‘thing’ called Christianity show respect for our Creator and not take important ideas such as an eternity in the presence of God so lightly as I have seen some churches, and many Christians do. If being a Christian is suppose to change us, why are so many of us still the same year after year? Why is it becoming a crime to point out the need for repentance, the need to stop sinning, the need to forgive?

If you have come to the Orthodox Church because you were looking for something different, then BE different! Participate as much as possible. Learn how to venerate an icon. Light a candle, say a prayer, cross yourself and bow down. Submerge yourself in the wonderment, traditions, and the divine mystery of the Orthodox Church. If you end up thinking that it is not for you, at least you can say that you gave it your best shot. If, however, you’ve been attending an Orthodox Church all the while refusing to fully participate, how can you know whether or not it was where you were supposed to be if you were never able to fully put aside your protestant fears and doubts?

How about the next service at your church whether it’s vespers or Div. Liturgy, you fully participate? How about lighting a candle, venerating an icon, or asking Mary to pray for you before the throne of God? You never know, maybe you’ll find out that this is where you were supposed to be all along but you didn’t know because you were holding back? Christmas is just around the corner. What a great time to get over yourself and enjoy some genuine wonderment.

Lord have mercy!

What happened last night

Quick Lessons from the Catechism: The Angels | TOM PERNA

The last couple of weeks have been rough. A dear family member was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer. I have had strep throat. My husband does not like it that I’m going to an Orthodox Church but praise God, he has not asked me to stop going. On the way to church last night for vespers, I prayed and asked God to give me a sign if I was supposed to stop attending this church. I was so excited to get there as it had been two Wednesdays since I had walked through those blessed doors. I picked up some candles in the narthex. a big red glass candle for the person with cancer, a small beeswax taper for myself, and hubby. Approaching the icons and lighting the candles, I start crying. Softly at first then, by the time I reach the large icon of Mary to the left of the holy doors, I’m sobbing. If she had been in physical form, I would have collapsed in her arms. What a blessing it was to be in the presence of such good friends. The love, the comfort, the peace. I make it to the back of the sanctuary and collapse into one of the tiny chairs that line the wall. I fumble in my purse for an unused tissue. A lady I had said, ‘hello’ to in the parking lot ambles up to me (she must use a cane to walk) and hands to me several tissues she had clutched in her hand. She asks me if I need anything, ‘prayer’ I say. While we talk, the parish priest, Fr. Anthony comes up to us. He squats down in front of me. ‘Melissa?’ he asks to confirm my name. I’m new there and we have spoken a bit over emails and in passing but there are over 200 people at this church. ‘Yes.’ I reply. ‘Did you still want to be a catecumen?’ he asks. (I had mentioned it to him in an email that I had wanted to make it official, then I came down with strep so it had not yet happened.) ‘Yes!’ I confirm with enthusiasm. In my mind I’m thinking; Yes, I want to be part of this church. Yes, I want to make it official! Yes, I want to, I want to, I want to!

Last night, standing at the back of my church, I officially became a catecumen.

... Victorian Religious Print Simply to Thy Cross I Cling Large | eBay
This is how I feel these days about going to the Orthodox Church. Clinging to it in the midst of the storms of life. It is my refuge.

So, it’s official. I’m walking that path facing East. What an interesting answer to prayer. Lord have mercy.

What does this mean?

I’ve been ordering study materials off of Amazon to help me understand Orthodoxy better. I’m researching icons and the meaning behind; this and that. One item I thought was particularly interesting was this cross.

San Damiano Crucifix from Monastery Icons

It is quite colorful. Everything about it tells us a story about the passion of Christ. It circles back around from the foretelling of what is to come; the angels holding the items to be used in the crucifixion of Christ are also featured in the icon of Mary; ‘Our Lady of Perpetual Help’. Since these instruments of the crucifixion are held in the hands of angels, we are shown that this is in the hands of God, not men. I’m going to stop right there and not tell you more about it because discovering these truths for ourselves is so much more powerful than having them spoon fed to us. Please click on this LINK to read more about the imagery used on this icon. This cross, in any size, would make a great gift this Christmas/Nativity season. It’s so easy to just give mindlessly during the holidays. As Christians, it is wholly appropriate to give gifts during the holidays that represent, and help us to reflect on, who Christ is, what He did for us, and that will help us draw nearer to Him- and thus further away from the destructive things of this world.

I am not receiving any sort of kickback from Amazon, or this website, by promoting this cross. I just think it would make a lovely gift for so many people for so many reasons. When I give them this year, I’m going to include the information on what the symbols mean so that those who receive them can have a deeper understanding of who Jesus is and what He has and still is, doing for us.

Eight inch cross for wall-LINK

Three and four eighths inch cross necklace (or can hang in car, office cubicle, etc.) LINK

Nine inch cross on stand LINK

Some of the crosses full depict every image on the Brigantine cross mentioned at the beginning of this article, some do not. I believe, however, that any of them would a blessing to the receiver as well as the giver.

A little self examination

ild mary of egypt is an icon of repentance and
Icon of Repentance, St. Mary of Egypt

No, I’m not talking about the physical self examinations we are all encouraged to perform on ourselves. I am referring to spiritual, soul focused, self examination. This is so important for Christians. Rather than excuse, or pray away, bad behaviors how about being willing to give them up? How about trading in your life of sin as-a-Christian, and reclaiming the glory of God through repentance? Here is a soulful look at the Ten Commandments where the penitent self examiner is asking of themselves how well they have adhered to each commandment.  This is taken from the: Antiochian Orthodox Christian Arch Diocese website. LINK

Self Examination Before Confession

First Commandment

Have I believed in God the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit? Have I failed to trust in God and his mercy? Have I complained against God in adversity? Have I been thankful for God’s blessings? Have I doubted the Christian faith and the teachings of the Church? Have I tried to serve God and keep His Commandments? Have I given way to superstition? Have I frequented the religious meetings of heretics and schismatics? Have I neglected my duties to God through fear of ridicule or persecution? Have I failed to pray to God faithfully? Have I put myself before God?

Second Commandment

Have I made an idol of any person or thing? Have I given to anyone or anything the worship that is due to God alone? Have I set before myself the holy life of Jesus and tried to imitate Him? Have I read the Holy Scriptures regularly? Have I been irreverent during Church Services, let my attention wander, or been insincere? Have I neglected to receive Holy Communion regularly or without due preparation?

Third Commandment

Have I profaned the holy name of God in any way? Have I cursed anyone or anything, or sworn a false oath? Have I failed to give proper reverence to holy persons and things? Have I had due respect for the clergy of the Church, or hindered them in performing God’s work? Have I broken any solemn vow or promise? Have I entered into any unlawful contract or made an unlawful promise?

Fourth Commandment

Have I stayed away from Church on Sundays or prevented others from going? Have I done unnecessary work on Sundays? Have I spent the day in unwholesome fashion or profaned it by improper conduct? If I could not go to Church because of illness or other grave cause, have I prayed at home? Have I caused anyone else to profane the Lord’s Day? Have I kept the Fasts and Festivals prescribed by the Church?

Fifth Commandment

Have I respected my parents and been obedient to them? Have I been guilty of deception, or caused them pain by my words or actions? Have I neglected them or failed to help them? Have I done my duty towards my family? Have I been wanting in love or kindness towards my husband (or wife), or harmed him (or her) in any way? Have I set my children a good example and tried to bring them up properly? Have I corrected their faults with patience and not with anger? Have I over-indulged or spoiled them? Have I neglected my god-children and failed in my obligations towards them? Have I worked for my employers honestly and diligently? Have I treated fairly all those who have worked for me? Have I honored God as my Heavenly Father by treating others as my brothers, and have I honored the Church as my spiritual Mother by honoring and practicing my religion in accordance with her teachings?

Sixth Commandment

Have I caused the injury or death of any one, or wished that I were dead? Have I done anything to shorten my own life or that of someone else by injuring health, or through evil and intemperate living? Have I given way to anger, or harmed others with words or actions? Have I defamed others who needed help, or failed to stand up for those unjustly treated? Have I been cruel to anyone? Have I mistreated animals or destroyed any life unnecessarily? Have I failed to forgive anyone or harbored evil thoughts against them?

Seventh Commandment

Have I given way to impure thoughts, words, or deeds? Have I committed any unworthy actions alone or with others? Have I degraded myself in any way, or forgotten human dignity? Have I read immoral books or magazines, or delighted in obscenity of any kind? Have I associated with bad companions or frequented unsavory places? Have I eaten or drunk or smoked too much? Have I been lazy, idle, or wasted my time? Have I led others to commit sinful acts? Have I been unfaithful to any trust confided in me?

Eighth Commandment

Have I stolen anything or wished to do so? Have I kept anything that did not belong to me? Have I tried honestly to find owners of lost articles I have found? Have I paid my debts? Have I lived within my income, and not wastefully and extravagantly? Have I given to charitable causes in proportion to my means? Have I been honest and upright?

Ninth Commandement

Have I told lies, or added to or subtracted from the truth? Have I made careless statements or spoken evil of anyone? Have I told any secrets entrusted to me, or betrayed anyone? Have I gossiped about anyone or harmed their reputation? Have I concealed the truth, assisted in carrying out a lie, or pretended to commit a sin of which I was not guilty? Have I tried to see the good in others rather than their shortcomings?

Tenth Commandment

Have I envied anything good that has come to others? Have I been jealous of another’s good fortune? Have I wished for anything that was another’s? Have I damaged or destroyed the property of others? Have I wished for things God has not given me, or been discontented with my lot? Have I been stingy? Have I held back anything due another? Have I hoped for the downfall of anyone so that I might gain by it? Have I failed to be gracious and generous to anyone? Have I expected God to give me that which I would refuse one of my fellow men?